education

Malcolm Jenkins Showcases Sports Science To Local Students

For the second year, The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation teamed up with Drexel University's ExCITe Center to host elementary and middle school students from the Philadelphia Promise Zone to provide them with the ability to learn using the S.T.E.A.M. (science, technology, engineering, arts, athletics, and math) method. After a successful one-week pilot program in 2016, the Young Dragons Summer S.T.E.A.M. day camp was expanded to six weeks with two weeks focused on S.T.E.A.M.-based curriculum."Our school system is forced to think about budgets and performance, and what happens is it just becomes a pipeline instead of a true educational institution. As long as they're pushing kids through, that's all that matters. They're missing a bunch of talent, especially in these underserved communities," Jenkins said. "There are talented and bright minds that need to be cultivated or given an opportunity to grow. This is an opportunity for us to spark some of those minds and let the kids go where they may."On Friday, Jenkins hosted over 40 of the students at the NovaCare Complex to show how the Eagles' Sports Science program incorporates all of the elements of S.T.E.A.M. Jenkins had a lightbulb moment while working out one day at the team's practice facility this offseason. He saw the monitor which displays a player’s power output while lifting weights and the students came to mind.
  "I thought this would be an awesome experience to bring the kids here and talk to them about sports science and what goes into practice, training, recovery, and rest," Jenkins said.Head strength coach Josh Hingst and director of high performance Shaun Huls embraced the idea and they did a similar presentation to the one that they give the players.The students spent time in the indoor bubble learning how to stretch properly before running through an obstacle course. They received healthy eating tips and grasped the importance of getting the proper amount of sleep every night. Jenkins admitted though that his favorite part of the day, however, was seeing the kids' faces light up with the technology that is used in the weight room."Coming to Philly, we realized that there is a jewel of resources right in the heart of the city that many kids don't have access to," said Gwendolyn Jenkins, Malcolm's mother and the president of The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation. "A part of the goal with the S.T.E.A.M. program is to provide them access to resources right there in their neighborhoods and to expose them to a way of learning that would introduce them to the industry of S.T.E.A.M."It can help them make choices and deal with challenges in everyday life that they learn through S.T.E.A.M., but also make good education choices and hopefully will inspire them to spark something of interest like maybe a career in science or math because they didn't have the knowledge or the understanding of how it plays with everything else they do in life. That's the goal."The Philadelphia Promise Zone is a two-mile section of West Philadelphia that was designated by the Obama administration because of an extremely high poverty rate of 51 percent, nearly double that of the rest of the city. The initiative helps connect local residents with organizations that work to provide better education, jobs, housing, and health services."The biggest thing we want to do with the foundation is give underserved children experiences. Personally, I know how all of these experiences I've had as an adult have made me who I am. I know how much a difference it has made in my life. I really want to give kids the opportunities that they otherwise wouldn't have," Malcolm Jenkins said.Jenkins was the recipient of the Byron “Whizzer” White Award in 2017, which is the "highest honor" given by the NFLPA to "the player who is just as dedicated off the field as he is on the field through community service in their team cities and hometowns." Since launching The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation in 2010, Jenkins has created special programs and events in his hometown of Piscataway, New Jersey and the three places where he's played football at the college and professional levels: Columbus, Ohio; New Orleans, and Philadelphia."I think we all have an obligation to use our platform, whatever it is, to make a difference to others and in the lives of others and to make this place we're living in a better place," Gwendolyn Jenkins said. "He has a large platform and he's using it to the fullest. That's all you can ask for, really. Making a difference. That's what life is about. How many lives did you impact? I think he's doing a great job. As a mom, I'm proud of that moreso than the football."Original article by Chris McPherson: http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/news/article-1/Malcolm-Jenkins-Showcases-Sports-Science-To-Local-Students/2f2d77a9-732f-47ba-b4b4-1d4f3c1c2b8e

TMJF Surpasses $100,000 in Scholarships to College Bound Students

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On May 11, 2017, NFL Pro Bowl Safety and Super Bowl Champion Malcolm Jenkins and The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation awarded scholarships to New Orleans college bound seniors, participating in the Foundation’s Project R.E.W.A.R.D.S. program (Reinforcing Education With Activities, Recreation and Developmental Supports) program in collaboration with College Track New Orleans for their commitment to academic excellence, leadership and community.The awards presentation was part of College Track New Orleans’ 6th annual Launch to College Ceremony, held at The Historic Carver Theater in New Orleans. The Foundation honored 16 of the 48 graduating seniors from this year’s class of 2017 as Malcolm Jenkins Scholars. With this honor, each student received a $1,000.00 scholarship toward financing his/her college education. An inspirational keynote address was delivered by The Honorable Terri Fleming Love, Court of Appeals Judge for the 4th District State of Louisiana, to graduating seniors from more than 15 high schools in the New Orleans metro area, their parents and other guests in attendance.“We are so proud to continue our partnership with College Track New Orleans in our mission to creating a positive and lasting impact in the lives of young people and their communities. Each year, we are continually impressed by those students who apply for the scholarship. Their perseverance to transcend the limits of their circumstances, dedication to making a difference, commitment to their education and vision for the future is inspiring,” said Jenkins. To date, more than $101,000.00 in scholarships have been awarded by The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation to 72 graduating high school seniors, of which 48% (35) are first generation college students.The event also honored college graduates from the second cohort of College Track graduates from the class of 2013, many of whom received scholarships from The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation. Gwendolyn V. Jenkins, President of The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation, presented the scholarships, which are awarded for Academic Excellence, Most Improved and Overcoming Adversity.

OPINION: “I was awarded $2.00 for TOPS, a dollar a semester”

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Karriem Bennet, senior at Warren Easton High School in New Orleans, reads her letter at a campaign rally protesting cuts to Louisiana’s merit scholarship program, TOPS, on April 4, 2017, at the Peoples Health New Orleans Jazz Market.
 

House Education ChairRep. Nancy Landry109 S. College RoadLafayette, LA 70503.Dear Rep. Nancy Landry,

I support one of the Cowen Institute’s recommendations of Instituting a Sliding Scale. If legislators want to ensure all students can remain eligible for the program, regardless of income, I recommend that the state create a means-tested sliding scale that offers students scholarship support based on their family income. All students, regardless of family income, could still qualify for TOPS, but the amount of the award would vary — students coming from families with lower incomes would receive larger rewards than students from families with higher incomes.When Mr. Patrick Taylor conceived the plan in 1988 and the state implemented it as Act 789, TOPS guaranteed access to college for low- and moderate-income students based on their academic achievements, and not on their ability to pay. In 1997, the governor enacted Act 1375 and Act 287 — removing the income cap. I personally believe the income cap was removed to assist the wealthier citizens of Louisiana. The wealthier citizens did not qualify for Pell Grant assistance, so their friends in the legislature gave them some assistance.According to a U.S. News & World Report “Best States” list in February 2017, Louisiana is the worst state in the country according to a new analysis based on health care, education, infrastructure, crime and other quality-of-life measures. The TOPS program afforded college-age students the ability to stay home or at least in the state to attend college. The state should be thrilled that we are staying home and attending state schools. If TOPS is going to give us $2.00 a semester, then we can go to schools out of the state. If we have to take out loans to attend college we might as well leave the worst-rated state and experience one of the better 49 states.I consider myself to be a fair person; this is why I prefer the instituting of a sliding scale for TOPS. Yes, TOPS started with an income cap, I would qualify under the income cap. I just believe that if we want to make the state a better place for ALL to live, we need to allow financial assistance to ALL that meet the academic criteria. We have to keep our brightest and driven commodities, the youth, in the state. “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world” — Nelson Mandela. Let’s use TOPS to help us to change Louisiana’s ranking from worst state to best state.Sincerely,Karriem A. BennettWarren Easton Charter High School

Malcolm Jenkins provides funding for OSU Complete Athlete Program

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On Oct. 1, 2016, Malcolm Jenkins, NFL Pro Bowl Safety for the Philadelphia Eagles, Super Bowl Champion, and former All-American Ohio State Buckeye, returned to his alma mater for homecoming and to watch the Buckeyes take on the Rutgers Scarlet Knights. During the first half of the football game, Jenkins participated in an on-field check presentation to The Ohio State University Athletic Department in the amount of $250,000.00, to support a new innovative life skills curriculum for current and former Ohio State student athletes.In 2015, Jenkins collaborated with Anomaly Sports Group President, Luke Fedlam, and Ohio State Athletics Director of Development, Raymont Harris, to develop the player transition program, entitled The Complete Athlete Program (CAP). The CAP program launched in May 2016 with a two-day seminar for approximately 20 current and former student athletes to help equip them with the essential knowledge and resources needed to successfully transition from their collegiate playing career. CAP participants were welcomed by Ohio State University Athletic Director, Gene Smith and participated in workshops held at Gerlach Hall on the Business School campus and at the Woody Hayes Athletic Complex.    Jenkins committed to provide a significant financial contribution, as well as, participate in the launch of CAP.The CAP seminars included a wide array of industry leaders serving as guest speakers on topics that many athletes struggle with during their career transition:

  • Personal Financial Management: Lawrence Funderburke, FunderMax Fitness
  • Lifestyle Management: Ryan Broyles, NFL Free Agent
  • Family Relationships: Stephen Rhodes, Signify Wealth
  • Understanding the Importance of Credit: Dennis Maag / Brian Stablein, JP Morgan Chase
  • Networking 101: Bethny Brown, Vice President Human Resources at Scotts Miracle-Gro Company
  • Career Planning: Eddie George, Former NFL Player, Actor, Sports Analyst, and Professor

 

Malcolm Jenkins Foundation Awards Scholarships to NOLA Youth

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The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation recognized high school seniors for their commitment to academic excellence, leadership and community through its Project R.E.W.A.R.D.S. program that teams up with the Nationally acclaimed  College Track Program. Twelve (12) students each received $1,000 scholarships, ($12,000) to start them on their way toward financing their college education.The 2015 Project R.E.W.A.R.D.S scholarship winners marks the fourth year that The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation has helped deserving youth pursue their higher educational aspirations at an accredited college or university of their choice.

Click here to view photos by KatRamPhotography 

2015 Malcolm Jenkins Scholars:

High Academic AchievementYolanda AndradeDiamond LandryDewey SampsonBianca AncarAlonzo BoothJeremiah WallaceMost ImprovedImani PittmanJordan FlemingOvercoming the OddsTia CageRobert BurnsideLauren BaumanOlivia Douglas