Philadelphia Eagles

Get Ready Fest - Brings 800 Camden families wellness resources, food and essentials.

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Since 2014, Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins has brought Get Ready Fest, his foundation’s signature charity event, to cities across the country. In Camden, New Jersey, 35 percent of households live below the poverty level and far too many children go to bed hungry. This is why The Malcom Jenkins Foundation and PepsiCo partnered with Feed the Children to kick off “Get Ready Fest: Helping Feed Camden” providing 800 Camden-area families with wellness resources, food and essentials.The event kicked off at 12 noon at Antioch Baptist Church, 690 Ferry Ave, Camden, NJ.“The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation (TMJF) is proud to team up and partner for this important event in the Camden area,” said Malcolm Jenkins, a New Jersey native.  Thursday's event was its first in Camden.

"We thought it was very important (to come to Camden)," he said. "It's that city that's right there on the other side of the bridge that you forget about, but me being from Jersey, we wanted to do something in New Jersey specifically and Camden just made sense to us.  Despite the rain, which Antioch pastor John Parker joked "baptized us all," about 800 families turned out for boxes of food, toiletries, books, school uniforms and supplies, and help with an array of social services.

Each family identified by Antioch Baptist Church received:

  • One 25-pound box of nonperishable food items
  • One 15-pound box of personal-care items
  • One box of AVON products
  • Books from Disney Publishing Worldwide
  • Frito-Lay snacks
  • PepsiCo beverages
  • Life Original Cereal
  • Quaker Standard Oats
  • Chewy Granola Bars
  • Variety of Campbell Soup products

In addition to providing enough food and daily essentials, the Get Ready Fest TM event offers an array of health-related services and information through the support of various community resource partners. These services include health screenings for blood pressure, cholesterol, etc., education and social service information relating to GED, job training, and senior and veteran support services. Additionally, the event includes a children’s resource area that provides services, children’s books, school supplies, haircuts, face painting, and snacks.

 

Super Bowl Party For The Homeless

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On Sunday Feb.4, 2018 at 5:00 PM, Chosen 300 Ministries, Inc. hosted its Annual Super Bowl Party For The Homeless. While Malcolm Jenkins was tackling the Patriots on the field he was defending the needs of others by making sure they had a enjoyable experience at the Chosen 300 Super Bowl Party.  This year Chosen 300's Annual Super Bowl Party was sponsored solely by The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation.  
 
The day started with a Sunday Morning Worship at 10:00 AM and all who attended received a wrist band to re-enter for the party at 5PM.  
 
Event Schedule: 
  • 5:00 PM - Doors Open for Homeless Guest
  • 5:30 PM  - Pre-Game Lunch
  • 6:30 PM - Super Bowl Kick Off
  • Half-Time - A Full Course BBQ Chicken Dinner. 10:00 PM or End of Super Bowl - Homeless Guest Depart
Executive Director Brian Jenkins (no relation) states "many of us have the opportunity to gather together with friends to watch the game, but for those who live in the streets and shelters, they do not share this same pleasure. Chosen 300 uses this day as an avenue to provide hope and help to those in need." 
 
Chosen 300 Ministries is a inter-denominational ministry that is well known for its work in Center City Philadelphia, West Philadelphia & Pottstown; distributing more than 150,000 meals a year to the homeless of our region.   The organization also provides hunger relief in Guyana, Jamaica, India, Nigeria, Liberia, Uganda & South Africa.  For more Information on Chosen 300 log on to www.chosen300.org 

Malcolm Jenkins Is The Eagles' Nominee For The Walter Payton NFL Man Of The Year Award

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The Philadelphia Eagles have named safety Malcolm Jenkins as their nominee for the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award.Considered one of the league’s most prestigious honors, the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award recognizes an NFL player for outstanding community service activities off the field as well as excellence on the field.Three of the 32 nominees will be selected as finalists for the national award, renamed in 1999 after the late Hall of Fame Chicago Bears running back. Finalists will be announced in January 2018."I'm so proud to be the Philadelphia Eagles' nominee for the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award," Jenkins said."I think it's important for athletes on any level, but especially pro athletes, to use their platform for more than themselves, more than the monetary gains, but to really make an impact."Jenkins leads the team tied for the best record in the NFL with 93 tackles. He also has two interceptions and a sack.One of the best free agent signings in Eagles history, Jenkins has four interception returns for touchdowns since joining the team in 2014 which ranks second just behind Eric Allen for most in the team record book.In 2015, Jenkins earned his first Pro Bowl nomination after career highs in tackles (120), pass deflections (15), and forced fumbles (3).Jenkins was previously recognized for his community work back in February as the recipient of the NFLPA's Byron "Whizzer" White Award. Jenkins joined Eagles Hall of Famers Brian Dawkins, Troy Vincent, and Reggie White as previous winners.Vincent and fellow Eagles Hall of Famer Harold Carmichael are former winners of the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award.  

Malcolm Jenkins Showcases Sports Science To Local Students

For the second year, The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation teamed up with Drexel University's ExCITe Center to host elementary and middle school students from the Philadelphia Promise Zone to provide them with the ability to learn using the S.T.E.A.M. (science, technology, engineering, arts, athletics, and math) method. After a successful one-week pilot program in 2016, the Young Dragons Summer S.T.E.A.M. day camp was expanded to six weeks with two weeks focused on S.T.E.A.M.-based curriculum."Our school system is forced to think about budgets and performance, and what happens is it just becomes a pipeline instead of a true educational institution. As long as they're pushing kids through, that's all that matters. They're missing a bunch of talent, especially in these underserved communities," Jenkins said. "There are talented and bright minds that need to be cultivated or given an opportunity to grow. This is an opportunity for us to spark some of those minds and let the kids go where they may."On Friday, Jenkins hosted over 40 of the students at the NovaCare Complex to show how the Eagles' Sports Science program incorporates all of the elements of S.T.E.A.M. Jenkins had a lightbulb moment while working out one day at the team's practice facility this offseason. He saw the monitor which displays a player’s power output while lifting weights and the students came to mind.
  "I thought this would be an awesome experience to bring the kids here and talk to them about sports science and what goes into practice, training, recovery, and rest," Jenkins said.Head strength coach Josh Hingst and director of high performance Shaun Huls embraced the idea and they did a similar presentation to the one that they give the players.The students spent time in the indoor bubble learning how to stretch properly before running through an obstacle course. They received healthy eating tips and grasped the importance of getting the proper amount of sleep every night. Jenkins admitted though that his favorite part of the day, however, was seeing the kids' faces light up with the technology that is used in the weight room."Coming to Philly, we realized that there is a jewel of resources right in the heart of the city that many kids don't have access to," said Gwendolyn Jenkins, Malcolm's mother and the president of The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation. "A part of the goal with the S.T.E.A.M. program is to provide them access to resources right there in their neighborhoods and to expose them to a way of learning that would introduce them to the industry of S.T.E.A.M."It can help them make choices and deal with challenges in everyday life that they learn through S.T.E.A.M., but also make good education choices and hopefully will inspire them to spark something of interest like maybe a career in science or math because they didn't have the knowledge or the understanding of how it plays with everything else they do in life. That's the goal."The Philadelphia Promise Zone is a two-mile section of West Philadelphia that was designated by the Obama administration because of an extremely high poverty rate of 51 percent, nearly double that of the rest of the city. The initiative helps connect local residents with organizations that work to provide better education, jobs, housing, and health services."The biggest thing we want to do with the foundation is give underserved children experiences. Personally, I know how all of these experiences I've had as an adult have made me who I am. I know how much a difference it has made in my life. I really want to give kids the opportunities that they otherwise wouldn't have," Malcolm Jenkins said.Jenkins was the recipient of the Byron “Whizzer” White Award in 2017, which is the "highest honor" given by the NFLPA to "the player who is just as dedicated off the field as he is on the field through community service in their team cities and hometowns." Since launching The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation in 2010, Jenkins has created special programs and events in his hometown of Piscataway, New Jersey and the three places where he's played football at the college and professional levels: Columbus, Ohio; New Orleans, and Philadelphia."I think we all have an obligation to use our platform, whatever it is, to make a difference to others and in the lives of others and to make this place we're living in a better place," Gwendolyn Jenkins said. "He has a large platform and he's using it to the fullest. That's all you can ask for, really. Making a difference. That's what life is about. How many lives did you impact? I think he's doing a great job. As a mom, I'm proud of that moreso than the football."Original article by Chris McPherson: http://www.philadelphiaeagles.com/news/article-1/Malcolm-Jenkins-Showcases-Sports-Science-To-Local-Students/2f2d77a9-732f-47ba-b4b4-1d4f3c1c2b8e

Malcom Jenkins – Nominated for Humanitarian of the Year

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As a defensive back in the NFL, Malcolm Jenkins is paid to take away from opposing offenses.But giving back is what fuels his life.Jenkins started his own non-profit organization, The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation, to help bring about positive change in the lives of underserved communities by providing resources, innovative opportunities and experiences to help them succeed in life. Guided by the core values of integrity, service, community and fiscal accountability, the foundation aims to be an organization that provides a positive and lasting impact to the communities it serves in New Jersey, Louisiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania.It was those values instilled in Jenkins by his parents, coaches, teachers, mentors and the church at a young age that drove Jenkins to succeed professionally as an athlete and entrepreneur. He wants to help others in need of that same type of support growing up to inspire them to become successful adults.To date, the Jenkins Foundation has awarded more than $100,000 in scholarships through the Project R.E.W.A.R.D.S program (Reinforcing Education With Activities, Recreation and Developmental Supports) with a four-year life skills curriculum, a program more than 200 students participate in each year. Of the 72 graduating high school seniors to receive scholarships through the Foundation, just under half are first generation college students.In addition to his Foundation, Jenkins has also spearheaded a Cease Fire Campaign to reduce gun violence in New Orleans while helping support to families affected by Hurricane Katrina.Jenkins attended Piscataway Township (New Jersey) high school and helped the football team win three consecutive state titles as a defensive back and wide receiver while also capturing a state track and field title in the 400 meters during his junior year. He was recruited by Ohio State and capped off a four-year career by winning the Jim Thorpe Award as the top defensive back in college football.A first-round pick of the New Orleans Saints in 2009, Jenkins helped New Orleans capture a Super Boow title during his rookie season. After five years with the Saints, Jenkins moved to the Philadelphia Eagles where he earned his first Pro Bowl nomination in 2015. Of his 14 career interceptions, Jenkins has returned six of them for a touchdown.You can support your favorite nominee in this campaign by favoriting, donating, tweeting and joining his/her team with a chance to be recognized as one of his/her top supporters.  Starting Friday, June 9, you can also come back daily to “Boost” your favorite nominee.  Fans receive points for joining a team, donating, tweeting, boosting or responding to “ do-gooder challenges”.The direct link to Malcolm’s page is https://asu.givkwik.com/MalcolmJenkinsAbout the award: Started in 2013 by Alan Pavlosky and Scott Manthorne, Co-Founders of All Sports United, the Most Valuable Philanthropist seeks to recognize the effort of deserving sports philanthropists each year and bring positive news while highlighting the amazing charitable work of many in the sports community.  The winner of the award will receive $10,000 to his or her charity of choice.  The campaign is supported by technology partners Givkwik and xocial.  Each of the partners plays a crucial role in executing the campaign.  Special Thanks to All Sports United Supporter Jeff Tutor for his contributions to the campaign. This entry was posted on Tuesday, June 13th, 2017 at 10:36 pm by By Erik Erlendsson http://allsportsunited.org/news/malcom-jenkins/

Malcolm Jenkins maintains strong commitment to New Orleans' youth

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Malcolm Jenkins' last trip to New Orleans was in the aftermath of violence.He stood at a podium to deliver a tribute for Will Smith at the funeral of his former New Orleans Saints teammate, Ohio State brother and good friend. It was moving. It was heartfelt. It was somber.The tragic ending is one more reason why Jenkins hasn't surrendered on his mission for The Malcolm Jenkins Foundation in New Orleans."Violence and crime happen every single day (in New Orleans)," Jenkins told me earlier this week. "Sometimes it takes those highly visible figures or something to make some realize what's happening every single day. It's really affecting our youth. It's not just adults dealing with this. It's our teenagers. "A lot of it is because they don't know they have other options. They've never seen any other options or any other ways to do things." Jenkins started the charity in 2010 while with the Saints to help supply New Orleans' youth with an avenue away from potential crime and violence. He wanted a route for those who wouldn't have dreamed about college to receive the necessary skills to make it there.

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Former Saints safety Malcolm Jenkins celebrates with teammates after
his strip of former Cowboys receiver Roy Williams on Thanksgiving Day 2010.

Jenkins will give another speech in New Orleans at Dillard on Thursday evening. This one will be more about hope and triumph. This one will be a victory speech over crime and violence.Through the foundation's Project REWARDS program and in collaboration with College Track New Orleans, Jenkins will award a round of scholarships for the fifth consecutive year to a selection of graduating seniors. It's the third round of scholarships doled out since Jenkins signed with Philadelphia in 2014."Obviously when I left New Orleans, I wanted to make sure everything stayed in tact," Jenkins said. "I don't see that changing. We started in New Orleans because we saw that there was a need. Just because I leave doesn't mean that the need leaves. So it's important for us to stay in the community and continue to help."It's a city that I love and that's supported me. I just try to do my part to give back."Someone like Troy Simon is exactly why Jenkins continues his efforts in earnest.Simon also will be a keynote speaker with Jenkins at Thursday's event. Simon was a member of the first group to receive a scholarship in 2012.Simon himself sometimes wonders how he's advanced this far.He didn't learn to read until he was an early teenager. As First Lady Michelle Obama described, Simon "would regularly cut school because the other students would tease him. When he did attend, he'd shove desks, start fights -- anything to get him out of class." Simon didn't want others knowing he couldn't read.Why does the First Lady know Simon's story?  Read full article>>>

Malcolm Jenkins returns to give back to Columbus

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Get Ready Fest CollageFormer Ohio State cornerback Malcolm Jenkins remembers the thrill of being the 14th overall pick in the 2009 NFL draft. But seven years since, and a day after the 2016 first round that saw five Buckeyes taken, Jenkins was gaining satisfaction of a different sort.This morning he was at the Columbus Urban League parking lot off Mount Vernon Avenue helping coordinate the second Get Ready Fest, a collaboration of his Malcolm Jenkins Foundation, Feed the Children and Teleperformance. With its mission to distribute a 25-pound box of food and a 10-pound box of personal hygiene products to 1,200 pre-identified families who can use the help, the orderly line stretched down the block.“We’re feeding and helping over 4,500 people,” Jenkins said. “They get not only the food, but they get resources, they get haircuts, help services -- everything that they need to really get a kick start.“Everything that we do we focus on youth, and families, and under-served communities because, you know, I’ve been blessed. There are people in need that look up to me as an athlete, that look up to everybody (including the hundreds of volunteers involved), and this is an opportunity for us to give back.” Ironically, it was his being drafted in 2009 that helped set him on this path. He was taken by the New Orleans Saints, thrusting him into a city still in the early years of its recovery from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina in 2005.“Seven years ago I was getting drafted to a city that had a lot of need,” Jenkins said. “I got to look around the community and could see there were people that needed help. So I did what little part that I could.“And through the Malcolm Jenkins Foundation we just started to give back to all the communities that have affected me.”That list includes New Orleans; his hometown area in and around Piscataway, N.J.,; Philadelphia, where he now plays for the Eagles; and Columbus, where he was a star for the Buckeyes. The program is in its fourth year overall.Asked whether he’d recommend becoming involved in such endeavors to those drafted on Thursday night, Jenkins said, “I think it’s all personal, and it all depends on what you want to invest your money in.“For me, I like to invest not only my money but my time into other people. I know that some people, whether it be (his former OSU coach and now Youngstown State University president) Jim Tressel, be it my high school coaches, my parents, they invested time in me, and I know the impact that it’s had on my life. So that’s what I like to give back to other people.”His friend and former New Orleans teammate Will Smith, who played at Ohio State before him, had been involved in several chartitable endeavors during his playing days and since his career ended after the 2013 season. But Smith, 34, was shot to death on a New Orleans street several weeks ago after a late-night traffic accident escalated into a confrontation with the driver who had hit him from behind.“Unfortunately I don’t know what the lesson is from this tragedy beside the fact life is short and you’ve got to enjoy the time you have with your friends and family,” Jenkins said. “It’s a tragic situation, and it brings to light to a bigger narrative about violence and some senseless acts.“That’s because it’s one thing to read a news clip about Will Smith’s passing, but it’s a different thing to go to his funeral and see his three kids and his wife who will never have him again. That’s something that I think we’ve become numb to. ... Will Smiths happen across this country every single day, and it’s unfortunate.”Jenkins, meanwhile, is an NFL veteran and Pro Bowl performer who has persevered for two teams during the past seven years, so he had some advice for those being drafted this week.“One, enjoy the ride,” he said. “There’s a lot of things, a lot of pressure, a lot of tugging and pulling -- everything is really set up for you to fail, basically. But you’ve got to enjoy it. And then, just be smart. Have a plan, because football is very, very short.“The law of averages say you’re only going to play for three years; if you play any more than that you’re lucky. But you’ll most likely be done playing when you’re 35. There’s a lot of life to live after that.  We get kind of brainwashed to think that football is all we can do. Enjoy it while you have it, take advantage of it while you have it, but also prepare for a life afterwards.”Original article taken from Columbus Dispatch | Ohio State Buckeyextra: http://buckeyextra.dispatch.com/content/stories/2016/04/30/0430-malcolm-jenkins.htmltmay@dispatch.com@TIM_MAYsports